Featured

Mental Dehabituation Linked to Marijuana and Psychedelic Drugs

Mental dehabituation is a psychological phenomenon where a person views something they have experienced before as a completely new experience which is of value to psychiatry, in particular in treating disorders like PTSD. Marijuana is not generally considered a psychedelic drug but some professionals believe that it can be used to trigger dehabituation.

Marijuana isn’t typically thought of as a psychedelic — a drug that produces hallucinations or an apparent expansion of consciousness.

But according to Julie Holland, a psychiatrist with a private practice in New York, some of cannabis’ effects are psychedelic in nature.

At a recent conference in London on the science of psychedelics, Holland said that using marijuana may be linked with a phenomenon some psychiatrists refer to as “dehabituation”  — the process of looking at something with fresh eyes.

“That can be very helpful in psychiatry,” she said.

Several forms of psychotherapy emphasize the idea that troubling situations center around a problem of perspective. By approaching those same scenarios from a new point of view — usually with the help of a therapist — we can fix our thinking and feel better.

Psychiatry and psychedelics share the common Latin root “psyche,” or mind, because both are believed to act on it, albeit in different ways. That’s one of the reasons that dozens of scientists, including psychiatrists like Holland, are increasingly supportive of the idea that psychedelic drugs might have a place in treating mental illness. Research on using traditional psychedelics like magic mushrooms, LSD, and ayahuasca to treat issues ranging from anxiety and drug addiction to depression has seen a major resurgence in the last few years.

While less of this research has focused on cannabis, Holland still believes the drug has some characteristics that could make it helpful in related ways.

“The thing that I’m interested in with cannabis is how it does this thing where everything old is new again,” she said.

To this end, Holland is serving as the medical monitor for a new study launched by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) that aims to assess whether marijuana could help reduce the symptoms of PTSD in veterans with the disorder.

Read more…

Tags
Show More

Brian Wroblewski

Brian Wroblewski has a passion for writing, travel, food and family. Since working in and around the cannabis industry since 2008, Brian brings a unique perspective to the cannabis journalism space. With a focus on emerging brands, moving the cannabis industry forward and an undeniable passion for truth in business and journalism, find some of Brian's posts across the web on digital marketing, cannabis and a variety of different topics.

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close
Close