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Marijuana Gummy Bears Banned in Colorado

Marijuana gummy bears have been one of the most popular edibles in recreational weed states, especially in Colorado. However, there have been a number of accidental overdoses and consumption by children of the marijuana gummy bears. In an effort to promote safe and sensible packaging in Colorado, the state is banning the sale of marijuana gummy bears and other edibles that would be appealing to children.

As marijuana moves into the mainstream markets, it is important to protect the children against accidental consumption of gummy bears and other edibles, so developing a standard on what gummy edibles can look like is important for the growth of the cannabis industry. As long as parents are keeping away their marijuana products the same way they would protect alcohol with their children, there will be less stories of children eating edibles, mistaking them for candy.

In an effort to keep kids from getting their hands on drug-laced candy Colorado will no longer allow retailers to sell any weed edibles that are shaped like animals, fruit, or humans, including any artistic, caricature, or cartoon renderings.

Geometric shapes and fruit flavors are fine, however.

The new rules also require products to have a larger potency label: Potency for medical and retail marijuana, concentrate and product must be labeled either in a font size that is at least two font sizes larger than the surrounding label text and also not less than 10 point font.

It also must be bold and enclosed within an outlined shape like a circle or a square, or highlighted with a bright color.

“These regulations reflect extensive stakeholder input focused on public safety and legislative intent,” said Mike Hartman, executive director for the Colorado Department of Revenue, in a recent statement. “Marijuana products in shape and branding should not be enticing to children and we want consumers to be educated about the potency of the products they are buying, these rules ensure that to be the case.”

 

read more at consumerist.com

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