90% of Medical Professionals Do Not Know Anything About Medical Marijuana

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A new study has been released stating that 90% of medical professionals have no working knowledge or understanding about the benefits of medical marijuana. Doctors, medical professionals and students all want to be able to study the effects of medical marijuana.

Once marijuana is removed as a Schedule 1 drug by the FDA, it will allow medical professionals to learn about cannabis and it’s health implications.

Medical marijuana needs to be authorized by a state marijuana certified physician in order for a patient to receive a medical marijuana card. Nearly everything you read on medical marijuana urges you to consult with your doctor to see if medical marijuana is right for you. What if your doctor does not know anything about medical marijuana though? A recent survey shows that medical professionals are generally ignorant of the potential benefits or drawbacks of medical marijuana.

For doctors that have been practicing medicine for a while, it is somewhat understandable that they may not have much of an education on marijuana considering state legalization is relatively new. Future medical professionals though should be receiving an education on medical marijuana, if for no other reason other than the fact that their patients are likely to be asking about it. The University of Maryland recently stopped courses on medical marijuana because the state attorney general advised them to do so because of the federal prohibition.

Although it’s becoming more commonplace, medical marijuana is rarely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study shows.

“Medical education needs to catch up to marijuana legislation,” said senior author Dr. Laura Jean Bierut, a professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

“Physicians in training need to know the benefits and drawbacks associated with medical marijuana so they know when or if, and to whom, to prescribe the drug,” she explained in a school news release.

Marijuana is now legal — at least for medical purposes — in more than half the states in the country, the researchers said.

Curriculum deans at 101 medical schools completed surveys about marijuana education. Just over two-thirds said their graduates weren’t prepared to prescribe medical marijuana. One-quarter said their graduates weren’t even able to answer questions about medical marijuana.

The researchers also surveyed 258 medical residents and fellows from across the country. Nine out of 10 said they were unprepared to prescribe medical marijuana. Eighty-five percent said they hadn’t received any education about medical marijuana.

A look at the Association of Medical Colleges database revealed that only 9 percent of medical schools taught their students about medical marijuana.

“As a future physician, it worries me,” said study first author Anastasia Evanoff, a third-year medical student.

“We need to know how to answer questions about medical marijuana’s risks and benefits, but there is a fundamental mismatch between state laws involving marijuana and the education physicians-in-training receive at medical schools throughout the country,” Evanoff said.

She added that physicians are now getting better training on opioids.

“We talk about how those drugs can affect every organ system in the body, and we learn how to discuss the risks and benefits with patients,” Evanoff said of opioids. “But if a patient were to ask about medical marijuana, most medical students wouldn’t know what to say,” she said.

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  1. If your Doctor doesn’t know you have to educate them enough so they will research it on their own. There are real drug interactions that are important to know about, which ones that will be potentiated and those that might be impaired or other subtle differences that need to adjusted for. I am 66 and have a myriad of diseases. I am diabetic have heart issues, blood pressure problems, bipolar, sleep apnea, thyroid, and still more! I talk to my doctor every time I see him on anything new about cannabis. I am taking 21 pills a day some are the same just different times. All of this makes it imperative that he knows what I am ingesting.
    Think about it all information is covered under Doctor patient privilege.

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