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New Edition Of TNMNews Features A Leading Female “Ganjapreneur”, Group Helping Veterans With PTSD Get Cannabis For Treatment

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The latest edition of TNMNews offers listeners an alarming juxtaposition. In Denver where recreational cannabis use is in its second year, cannabis is permeating the social scene and given the green light at exclusive invitation-only symphony ensemble performances and other swanky events. Meanwhile, veterans all over America who are struggling with PTSD are forced into battle over treating their condition with safe, all-natural cannabis-based medicines.

The show kicks off with and interview with Amy Dannemiller, aka Jane West, who is as cheerful in her interview with TNMNews as the events she curates in Denver. Capitalizing on her over 18 years of professional event planning experience, the Denver businesswoman launched cannabis-friendly Edible Events, which caters to an underserved demographic. (You probably won’t see guys wearing hoodies dabbing at any of her events.)

Guests are encouraged to bring and use their own cannabis to Dannemiller’s events, which are carefully planned to please taste buds, noses, and ears. They have included Octoberfest, Halloween, and New Year’s celebrations. In 2014, Edible Events produced Classically Cannabis: The High Note, a series of private cannabis-friendly fundraising events featuring performances by Colorado Symphony chamber ensembles.

While this is great news for the people of Denver who enjoy cannabis at parties, veterans all over the country continue to struggle with authorities over medicinal cannabis.

The new TNMNews show concludes with executive director and cofounder of Operation Grow4Vets Roger Martin describing ongoing struggles veterans face getting effective medicine and support when they return home. He brings up some sobering statistics. Incidents of PTSD has reached 21{f1d755e3d686d84b3fba3fb9da3bc25d6eb08724c18385fd50146d58c836a6dd} with younger veterans and 31{f1d755e3d686d84b3fba3fb9da3bc25d6eb08724c18385fd50146d58c836a6dd} with older veterans is 31{f1d755e3d686d84b3fba3fb9da3bc25d6eb08724c18385fd50146d58c836a6dd}. And twenty-two veterans die every day from suicide, not including those who die from drug overdose.

What is the problem? The US Army veteran shares his own struggles. He says that he was prescribed OxyContin for chronic pain when OxyContin first hit the market, and by 2010 he was taking 180 mg of the opioid daily plus 20-30 mg of Ambien at night just to get two to three hours of sleep. In 2010 his new doctor saw he was suffering and prescribed Suboxone and recommended medical marijuana to help him get off of opioids .

The system, not cannabis are the enemy. Martin points out that drug tests make it harder for a cannabis patient who uses marijuana sparingly to get a job than an alcoholic. He also says many unemployable veterans are forced into poverty or into the workforce because the VA doctors deem them partially—like 60{f1d755e3d686d84b3fba3fb9da3bc25d6eb08724c18385fd50146d58c836a6dd}–disabled, so they do not receive full benefits.

Martin’s organization, Operation Grow4Vets helps veterans get cannabis-based medicine. Most of the medications are donated in the form of oils or tinctures, and vets can enroll online at http://grow4vets.org/. He says response has been overwhelming, and not a day passes where he doesn’t hear a touching story from a vet who is struggling.

The latest edition of The National Marijuana News premieres Saturday April 4 and will run throughout the week at tnmnews.com. For more details, email Executive Producer Martín Wagmaister at: martin@tnmnews.com.

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Richard Lowe

Richard Lowe is a 14-year veteran of the financial sector with licenses as a commodity broker (Series 3) and investment advisor representative (IAR Series 65). Along with a focus on raising capital for the firms he was employed with, he also wrote and edited much of the content published by them. He holds a BA in Journalism from the University of Massachusetts. He has been a longtime advocate for marijuana legalization due to the social injustices associated with marijuana prohibition and the strong potential for the medicinal benefits of cannabis.

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