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Art Inspiring Positive Change, Flaws in Cannabis DUI Laws, and Why Invest in Hemp On The Latest Edition Of The National Marijuana News Radio Program

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Tune in tomorrow on TheNationalMarijuanaNews.com and select radio stations across the country for the latest edition of the country’s most educational and informative program surrounding the topic of marijuana. This week’s edition features filmmaker and activist, Sam Sabzehzar; Marijuana Policy Project Director of State Policies, Karen O’Keefe; and former drug smuggler turned marijuana mogul, Bruce Perlowin.

Positive Change through Art

Sam Sabzehzar is working to change the world through art. He uses it as a platform to share stories that change people’s lives by shifting attitudes and observations in a positive direction. He tells TNMNews hosts Todd Denkin and Jen Gentile that, much in the way that Robert Wyland’s epic murals in urban centers generated greater appreciation and protection of whales and marine life, he uses art as a platform to help share stories that change people’s lives. His goal is to inspire others to shift their attitudes and actions in a more positive direction.

Sam is concerned about the effect of the War on Drugs on foreign policy. Although Mexico isn’t creating or using drugs, he believes the effect of it being a black market trade route for drugs being produced in South America and heading for the United States is creating violence.

Sam Sabzehzar is the co-founder of Medicalmarijuana411.com, a platform for patients, doctors, and scientists to share their stories and research.

Why Cannabis DUI Laws Don’t Work

Karen O’Keefe, JD, the Director of State Policies for Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), believes that cannabis DUIs should be handled the way they are mostly handled today: by looking at all of the evidence, including looking at if the person is driving in a way that indicates they are impaired, and not just how much THC is in the person’s blood.

“There is no set amount, like there is with alcohol, where you can be reasonably sure people are actually impaired when they are at that level,” says Karen.

Unfortunately, Karen says, some states have a zero tolerance laws—which means that if a person used cannabis a week or even a month ago, he or she could be convicted of a DUI. Other states go strictly by how much THC is in the driver’s blood, but Karen warns that is also problematic

“You could have used marijuana a week ago, or even in some cases a month ago, and it would still be a crime to drive in some states,” says Karen.

Washington and other states have set the THC blood limit for a driver at five nanograms per milliliter of blood. But Karen believes this number is flawed because there haven’t been enough studies performed on regular cannabis users, who might have higher levels of THC in their blood.

“What we have seen is that a person can use marijuana at night, sleep for the whole night, wake up, be completely sober, and still be three time that limit if they are a regular user,” says Karen, who believes the DUI laws are a backdoor way of criminalizing marijuana and making it impossible for regular cannabis users to drive.

Hemp Industry Bigger than Medical and Recreational Marijuana Combined

Former drug smuggler turned medical marijuana mogul Bruce Perlowin says that while everyone wants to get involved in marijuana, hemp offers many advantages, as it can be sold in all 50 states and internationally.

Hemp seed and hemp oil is sold in stores all across the country, including in Costco, says Bruce, who estimates that the market for hemp plastics—just one product than can be made from hemp—is bigger than all of medical and recreational marijuana combined.

His company, Hemp, Inc., is involved in clothing lines, nutraceuticals, candles, and consulting. Just one division, the Industrial Hemp and Medical Marijuana Consulting Company, Inc., generated $5 million in the first quarter of 2014.

Known as the King of Pot, Bruce’s San Francisco Bay Area cannabis smuggling operation was featured in a CNBC documentary titled Marijuana Inc. Twenty-three million people watched it, and it became CNBC’s most popular documentary to date.

Tune In

Hear these interviews and always get the latest news and information on TheNationalMarijuanaNews.com.

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