San Diego Adult-use Marijuana Sales Starts the Surge in California

Spread the love

Day one of the new year and a new beginning for the California recreational marijuana market began with San Diego, as expected. Many towns and counties in California have either banned adult-use marijuana dispensary sales or are still attempting to put rules into place. San Diego adult-use marijuana sales were ready to go yesterday though and the turnout was significant.

Urbn Leaf saw its average attendance nearly triple having only been able to sell medical marijuana up until now. Many cannabis workers and store owners were unsure of what to expect with the advent of legal adult-use marijuana in California. Residents may be quite comfortable with the illegal market and legalization has been a long time coming for a state that has strongly supported legal cannabis since the 90’s.

…before dawn on Monday, lines began to form outside stores like Urbn Leaf in Bay Park and Torrey Holistics in Sorrento Valley. And they only grew longer.

By sunset, 170 people were still lined up at Urbn Leaf, which had already served more than 800 customers, roughly triple its normal business.

“They’re coming in droves,” said Will Senn, co-founder of Urbn Leaf, which has a second store in Golden Hill. “I really underestimated what would happen.”

Senn whipped up some of the demand, busing in customers from a bar in Pacific Beach. He also used 27 drivers to make deliveries throughout San Diego, which is currently the only part of the county where recreational cannabis can be sold.

“We can deliver marijuana in 20 minutes; it’s like pizza,” said Senn, who has doubled his workforce in Bay Park in recent weeks.

Other states like Colorado and Washington have been able to sell recreational marijuana for years and Nevada began selling it last July. Wildfires in California burning up and smoking cannabis crops left a lot of people concerned that their may not be enough crop to cover demand. Do you think that the novelty of legal marijuana has already warn off and California may have missed most of the initial surge in demand?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *